Cajon Valley Middle School Field Trips to Enniss Inc. in Lakeside, CA

Written by Alyssa Burley.

On April 15th and 26th, 2016, Project Cornerstone coordinated two field trips to Enniss Inc. for about 70 students and 12 teachers and parents, from Cajon Valley Middle School in El Cajon, CA.

Enniss Inc. is a unique construction company that has a variety of divisions that include sand and material sales, and construction material recycling.  Students toured the Lakeside facility where they learned about the quarry, processing and recycling plant.

The students broke into small groups and visited various stations.       

Students learn about the heavy equipment used at the facility.

Heavy Equipment.

Heavy Equipment.

They learned about asphalt and broke open geodes.

They blended their own amended soil and planted a flower, which they were able to take home.

Amended Soil.

Amended Soil.

Students also made their own small batches of concrete and formed them into various shapes using silicone molds.

Broken Geodes.

Broken Geodes.

Concrete Projects.

Concrete Projects.

All the students, teachers and parents enjoyed the hands-on field trip.

Thank you to Enniss Inc. for opening your facility to these students.

Photos by Alyssa Burley.

Cajon Valley Middle School Field Trips to Sycamore Landfill and Hanson Aggregates Rock Quarry in Santee

Written by Alyssa Burley.

On March 1, 2, 15, & 17 2016, sixth grade students from Cajon Valley Middle School toured the Sycamore Landfill and Hanson Aggregates rock quarry in Santee, CA.

The students learned about the partnership between the rock quarry and landfill.  Hanson Aggregates mines the aggregate (rock) used in construction materials like concrete and asphalt, which makes space for Republic Services to dispose of the region's solid waste (aka trash).

Students were pleasantly surprised with the cleanliness of the entire facility.  Several students asked, "where's the trash?"  Gabe Gonzales, Operations Supervisor for Republic Services, explained the mountain they were driving on was made of waste and is now covered with the yellow fill.  Yellow fill is a by-product from the rock quarry.  Hanson Aggregates mines the rock from the site; the left over dirt (aka yellow fill) is used to cover the trash on a daily basis.  Mr. Gonzales also explained how methane gas is collected from the decomposing waste and used to generate power that is sold to San Diego Gas & Electric.

After touring the landfill, students split into small groups to learn about the rock quarry and the various construction aggregate products it produces, and the heavy equipment that is used, perform a gradation analysis on aggregate samples, and make their own concrete.

The field trip was designed to introduce students to the real-world Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) that are involved in the construction aggregates industry, and to show how the industry is vital to our communities.

Photos by Alyssa Burley

Photos by Alyssa Burley

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Towards the end of the field trip, one student excitedly explained he would be old enough to be the Hanson Aggregates Plant Manager by the time Eric Inouye, the current Plant Manager, retires.  Many students were curious about the various careers within the facility.

"This field trip is so excellent for our students. This industry should not hide, but broadcast how they support and their importance to our communities," said a one of the teachers on the field trip.

Additional field trips to this location are scheduled for March 15th and 17th, 2016.

We would like to give a special thank you to RDO Equipment Co. for providing the equipment that was on display for the field trips.

Cajon Valley Middle School Visits Superior Ready Mix

Written by Alyssa Burley.

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On Tuesday, March 8, 2016, 58 sixth grade students from Cajon Valley Middle School visited the Superior Ready Mix rock quarry in San Diego, CA.

The students toured the rock quarry, visited the labs where they test the strength of concrete and perform sieve analyses on the materials, and then made their own concrete projects to take home.

The teachers were thrilled the field trip was both educational and fun.  The students were extremely excited to learn about construction aggregates and the role they play in our communities. 

"This field trip was AWESOME," exclaimed one student.

The field trip was designed to introduce students to the real-world Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) that are involved in the construction aggregates industry, and to show how the industry is vital to our communities.

Photos by Crystal Howard

Photos by Crystal Howard

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Field Trip with Students from Frazier Elementary

Frazier Elementary School's Principal Kniseley tweets about the in-class activities.

Written by Alyssa Burley.

On Friday, November 6, 2015, about 75 sixth-grade students from William H. Frazier Elementary School in Fallbrook, CA, visited Granite Construction's Rosemary's Mountain rock quarry in Fallbrook and participated in Project Cornerstone's in-class activities.

Crystal Howard, Alyssa Burley, and Jamie Metivier led the in-class activities which included a lecture about the local construction aggregates industry, a lab experiment where students analyzed sand samples to determine which type is best for making concrete, and a science project where students were able to make small concrete projects to take home.

 
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Photos by Alyssa Burley and Crystal Howard.

While at the quarry, Gary Nolan from Granite Construction led the students on an educational tour.  They learned where the construction aggregates used in concrete and asphalt products are mined and processed.  Students were able to see how the large rocks are processed and sorted into smaller rocks in order to be used for construction purposes.

Thank you Granite Construction for opening your rock quarry to these local sixth-grade students.

Field Trip to RCP Block & Brick and Walker Preserve in Santee

Written by Alyssa Burley.

Students from the Lakeside Community Center visited RCP Block & Brick and the award-winning Walker Preserve in Santee, CA on Friday, August 28, 2015.

RCP Block & Brick is a concrete masonry and hardscape supplier.  The company mined sand from the San Diego River in order to manufacture concrete blocks used in local construction projects (e.g., hospitals, parking structures, schools, homes and community centers).

Students toured the facility and saw first-hand how concrete blocks are made.  Tom Phelps from RCP Block & Brick noted the blocks used to build the elephant enclosure at the San Diego Zoo came from the Santee plant and were made with sand mined from the San Diego River.

While at the plant, the students performed a sieve analysis to determine which sample of sand is best for making concrete (i.e., river or beach sand).  Then, they mixed their own concrete using sand, gravel, cement and water.  Instead of making concrete blocks, each student choose a fun silicon mold to use.  Some chose footballs, butterflies and trucks.  At the end of field trip each student were able to take their concrete projects home. 

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Walker Preserve was created by removing sand from the San Diego River bottom.  The sand was used to make building materials.  The voids that were left from the sand removal were turned in to several ponds.  The ponds provide a water source for local wildlife and pleasant views for residents. The site’s reclamation plan transformed the formerly dry river bed into a rich nature preserve.

The students toured the trail and learned about the area's former use as a sand mine and the reclamation project designed to establish native vegetation along the slopes.

The City of Santee built the trail that runs along the northern edge of the preserve.  It is open to the public for walking, equestrian riding and biking. 

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Photos by Alyssa Burley.

Field Trips with Students from Cajon Valley Middle School

Eric Inouye explaining the different sizes of materials at the quarry.

Eric Inouye explaining the different sizes of materials at the quarry.

Written by Alyssa Burley.

On February 19th, March 10th, 19th and 24th, Project Cornerstone conducted four of five scheduled field trips to Hanson Aggregates' Santee Rock Quarry at the Sycamore Landfill in Santee, CA.  The final field trip for the 2014-2015 school year will take place on Monday, April 20, 2015.

On each field trip, Eric Inouye from Hanson Aggregates and Gabe Gonzales from Republic Services led sixty sixth-grade students from Cajon Valley Middle School, on a tour of the landfill and rock quarry site.

Nick Qualin and Eddie Chapman performing a gradation analysis using a mechanical sieve.

Nick Qualin and Eddie Chapman performing a gradation analysis using a mechanical sieve.

Shane Hancock, Nick Qualin, Eddie Chapman, John Portlock and Trisha Moore from Hanson Aggregates, and Crystal Howard, Alyssa Burley and James DeCarolis from Project Cornerstone, assisted with the field trip.  They guided students as they rotated through three stations where they learned how to perform a gradation analysis on sample materials, made concrete, and learned about the heavy equipment used to mine rocks at the quarry.

Using a mechanical sieve to separate the rocks into various sizes, the student were able to evaluate the data, calculate percentages, and determine if the sample met the material specifications.

Students making concrete.

Students making concrete.

Students learned about the materials needed to make concrete (i.e., sand, gravel, cement and water), where quarries are located relative to their school, and then they made small batches of concrete.  The students poured their concrete mixtures into silicone molds of footballs, trucks, butterflies, flowers and other fun shapes.  Once the concrete was cured, they were returned to the students to take home.

Each student was able to sit in the cabs of loaders and a concrete truck.  They asked questions about how the equipment worked and had their individual photos taken.  After the field trip, students were given the photos to take home.

Students touring the inside of a loader.

Students touring the inside of a loader.

A few students asking Eddie Chapman questions about the hillside.

A few students asking Eddie Chapman questions about the hillside.

Students' photos from the field trip.

Students' photos from the field trip.

Sycamore Landfill and Rock Quarry. Photo courtesy of Republic Services.

Sycamore Landfill and Rock Quarry. Photo courtesy of Republic Services.

Sycamore Landfill and Rock Quarry
Hanson Aggregates is the quarry operator who extracts and crushes the stone from the Sycamore Landfill quarry site.  The crushed stone is then used to make construction materials that build and maintain the community’s infrastructure (e.g., roads, bridges, schools and homes).

Republic Services operates the landfill.  The voids left from the stone extraction are filled with the community’s refuse.

By-products from the quarry (i.e., dirt, aka yellow fill) are used to cover the refuse in the landfill.

It’s a perfect partnership - the crushed stone is removed from the site to build and maintain our infrastructure, while making room to dispose of our community’s refuse.

Photos by Alyssa Burley.

Updated 3/31/2015.